Author Archives: Gregory Bresiger

A MoneySense Great Dies

He was a remarkable money management guru. Mutual fund giant James E. Stowers recently died at the age of 90. His life and work were in the traditions of Sir John Templeton, John Bogle and Warren Buffett. Starting with very little, he used common sense, discipline and basic money management techniques to build a successful…

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Why People Leave New York and Other Taxing Climes

Some countries, some states, and some cities are enjoying big growth rates and some aren’t. Why? In part, it’s because some politicians are unaware or maybe don’t care about the damage their taxes, work rules and the standard of education——how prepared the average young person is to work after 12 or 16 years or more…

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You’re Coming Up on the Magic 59—- Don’t Botch It

You can give yourself a better chance of increasing your retirement savings even though you may think it’s time to stop saving and start spending. Let’s say you’re coming up on the magic age of 59.5. Why is this a magic age? It is an age, under most qualified retirement plans in the United States,…

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Grand Delusions (Part II)

Some investors take a provincial view and it could cost them, a former Schwab official warns. You buy domestic stocks and bonds on a regular basis for your qualified retirement account at work and your IRA. Maybe you add a few Japanese equities and some European stocks in the interests of diversification. All you have…

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The Grand Delusion of Democracy: How governments pretend to pay their bills

Over the past 80 years or so governments have been expected to provide more and more social services. That means bigger and bigger bills for the taxpayers of this generation and generations unborn. Since governments almost constantly run in the red, they often resemble cocaine addicts desperately looking for the next fix. The fix, in…

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You’re Young, You Don’t Make a Lot, but Your Dream Is to Own a Home or Apartment. How? One couple’s experience

Twenty six years ago my new wife, the ever comely Suzanne Hall, and I were middle-aged, had low incomes, had no almost no assets and yet we both dreamed of owning our residence. All our lives—-I was in my late 30s—-we had lived in rented apartments, but we wanted control of our lives. We wanted…

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